The 4 Federally Endangered Bats in Virginia

There are several species of bat that are common to the Virginia state, from Little Brown bats and Big Brown bats to Northern Long-Eared bats, Hoary bats, Townsend’s Big-Eared bats, Eastern Red bats, Eastern Small-footed bats, Seminole bats, American Long-Eared bats, and many more. Of the 15 total bat species in Virginia, sadly, 4 are listed as Federally-protected or threatened.

Continue reading to learn more about the endangered bats of Virginia, and reasons why their species are in decline.

Bat Critter Control Service Virginia 804-729-9097
Bat Critter Control Service Virginia 804-729-9097

Endangered Bat Species in Virginia

Virginia Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus)

The Virginia big-eared bat was officially made our state bat 14 years ago. They range consists of eastern Kentucky, eastern West Virginia, southwestern Virginia, and northwestern North Carolina. As for their conservation status, the Virginia big-eared bat was categorized as an endangered species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service in 1979. This makes it strictly-protected under state and federal law. In better news, a recent report provided by a Loab’s ‘Conservation and Management of Eastern Big-Eared Bats’ study estimated that a 77% increase in their populations took place between 1983 and 2009.

Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens)

The Gray bat was categorized as both federally and state-endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service in 1976. When initially placed on the endangered species list, there were an estimated 2 million Gray bats. Happily, through continuous and successful conservation efforts, they are now estimated to be around 2.3 million and counting.

Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii)

Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bats look so similar to our state bat, that they are often confused for one another! Sadly, Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bats are a state endangered bat and currently on the conservation list. The loss and degradation of their natural habitats is a top cause of the declining Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat population.

Indiana Bat (Myotis solidalis)

The Indiana bat is a federally-protected, endangered species of bat. Sadly, there are less than 300,000 Indiana bats remaining in the United States today. During summer months, they roost in tree cavities and underneath dark bridges; but when winter arrives, Indiana bats start looking for warmer shelter, such as limestone caves, abandoned buildings, mines, and more.

Are you having problems with bats in the attic or chimney? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for prompt and professional bat removal and control services at the right price. We serve all of Virginia, including Roanoke, Midlothian, Fredericksburg, Glen Allen, and more.

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Comparing Little Brown Bats With Big Brown Bats
FAQS About Endangered Bats

FAQS About Endangered Bats

Bats are incredible mammals. Not only are they the only mammalian species capable of true, authentic flight, they play a vital role in our surrounding Eco-systems. And although bats have a stigma to them, and a poor reputation for being a nuisance to home and building owners, they are protected under state and federal law. This is especially true for endangered bat species. Sadly, species all across the globe are still becoming endangered and close to extinction. We have to work harder as a society to support animal protection and initiatives in order to keep our beloved animal kingdom sustainable and strong.

Continue reading to review some common questions about endangered bats, including which species are endangered, why some bats are becoming extinct, and much more.

Virginia Bat Removal and Control
The Lesser Short-Nosed Fruit Bat is a species of Megabat that lives in Southeast Asia and Indonesia.

How Many Bats are Endangered?

Endangered bats are also referred to as “threatened” species. There are multiple levels of endangerment. Bat species may fall under “Critically-Endangered” or “Endangered” depending on the severity of threat.  According to the IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) Red List of Threatened Species, there are 26 critically endangered species, 51 endangered species, and 954 additional species that are considered vulnerable to endangerment. However, these numbers are always changing and difficult to keep up with.

Is There a Difference Between Endangered and Extinct?

Extinct species have all died out and are no longer in existence anywhere on the planet. The term extinct is though to come from the Latin term, extinctus, which translates to the modern, extinguish. Endangered species face an imminent risk of extinction. Some examples of extinct animals include the Dodo, Great Auk, Steller’s Sea Cow, and the Tasmanian Tiger.

Why Do Bats Become Extinct?

There are several reasons that have contributed to the demise of certain bat species. Such factors include land over-development, diseases like White Nose Syndrome, and habitat destruction. In fact, the biggest contributing factors are loss of habitat, like caves, forests, and nesting areas. When bats lose their homes, they search for new homes, like our attics and crawl spaces! It is not their fault, which is why bats should never be regarded as a bad animal. They are innocent creatures that have suffered substantial habitat loss.

Which Bats are Endangered in the United States?

According to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, there are 13 endangered bat species in the United States. Under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, there are 5 species and sub-species that are identified as Endangered. They are as follows:

Bonneted BatEumops floridanus
Gray Bat Myotis grisescens
Hoary Bat Lasiurus cinereus semotus
Indiana BatMyotis sodalis
Lesser Long-Nosed Bat – Leptonycteris curasoae yerbabuenae
Little Mariana Fruit BatPteropus tokudae
Mariana Flying FoxPteropus mariannus mariannus
Mexican Long-Nosed BatLeptonycteris nivalis
Northern Long-Eared BatMyotis septentrionalis
Ozark Big-Eared BatCorynorhinus townsendii ingens
Pacific Sheath-Tailed BatEmballonura semicaudata rotensis
Samoan Pacific Sheath-Tailed BatEmballonura semicaudata semicaudata

And Sadly………
The Virginia Big-Eared Bat
(Corynorhinus Townsendii Virginianus)

Got Nuisance Bat Problems in Virginia?

Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for safe and humane bat removal and control at a fair price. Regardless of the size or scope of your bat abatement and cleanup needs, we have the experience and resources necessary to remedy your bat problem in no time at all. Our professionals are focused on safe and effective results, but more importantly, our client’s complete satisfaction. Contact us anytime for free estimates, advice, and assistance.

Virginia Bat Removal and Control

How Many Bats are Endangered?

Bats are wonderful contributors to our surrounding Eco-systems, and even our very own local economies. For this reason, it is a sad truth that bats are not as safe as we wish them to be on this planet. There are several dangers that threaten various bat species all across the world, some of which are caused by mankind, and others that are virtually out of our control.

Continue reading to learn more about the endangered and threatened bat species around the world, and what you can do to support local bat populations in your town.

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Endangered Indiana Bat

Threatened Bats

Threatened bats are not technically endangered, but still at risk. “Threatened” means that the bat population numbers are at a steady decline, putting the species closer to being listed as endangered. You see, bats typically give birth to only 1 pup, per year, so population growth rates are slower than most other flying species. According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), there are currently 104 threatened bat species around the world.

Endangered Bats

Endangered bats are those that have reached seriously low population numbers and at risk of extinction. According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), there are currently 53 endangered bat species around the globe. Some species of bat listed as endangered include the Giant golden-crowned flying fox, Greater long-nosed bat, Indiana bat, Livingstone’s fruit bat, Gray bat, Townsend’s big-eared bat, Lesser long-nosed bat, Northern long-eared Myotis, and our very own Virginia Big-Eared bat.

Critically Endangered Bats

According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), there are currently 24 bat species listed as “Critically Endangered.” Critically endangered bats are at risk of imminent, or forthcoming, extinction. It is similar to being listed as a terminally ill patient at a hospital. Although there is hope for a comeback, history tells us that extinction will be close, at some point in time. See our blog, “Federally Endangered Species of Bat in Virginia” to learn about the 3 species of bat that are protected under the Endangered Species Act.

How to Support Local Bats

You can do your part to support the local bat populations around your community without putting your property at risk of structural damage or safety hazards. See our blog, “How to Safely Support Local Bat Colonies” to learn how to get started.

How to Safely Manage Nuisance Bats

Call Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 when you need prompt and professional Virginia bat removal and control you can afford. We use safe and humane methods to deliver effective 24 hour bat control for residential and commercial properties throughout Virginia. We serve all of Virginia, including Richmond, Petersburg, Short Pump, Lynchburg, Charlottesville, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Newport News, Virginia Beach, and all of their surrounding areas.

Federally Endangered Species of Bat in Virginia

Here in Virginia, there are 16 known bat-species. Of these numbers, 3 in particular are listed as Federally-endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and therefore, protected under the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading to learn more about this species, and what you can do to help support their preservation.

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Gray Bat (Myotis grisescens)

The Endangered Species Act

The 3 Federally-endangered species that are protected under the Endangered Species Act include the Gray Bat, Indiana bat, and the Virginia Big-Eared bat.  Under this act, it is a Federal offense (also known as a felony) to “harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any such conduct” any endangered or threatened species. This citation comes straight from the Endangered Species Act. Read our blog, “State Laws Surrounding Wild Bats” to learn about the laws that govern non-endangered bats. For now, here is a brief explanation of each Federally-endangered bat species found here in Virginia:

Gray Bat

The Gray bat is part of the Animalia kingdom, Chordata phylum, Mammalia class, and Chiroptera order. Their scientific name, Myotis grisescens, is derived from their genus (Myotis), and species (M. grisescens). Since 1976, they have also listed as federally endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. When initially placed on the list, there were an estimated 2 million; and through successful conservation efforts, they are now estimated to be around 2.3 million and counting.

Indiana Bat

The Gray bat is part of the Animalia kingdom, Chordata phylum, Mammalia class, and Chiroptera order. Their scientific name, Myotis sodalis, is derived from their genus (Myotis), and species (M. sodalis). Although this species was initially added to the list in 1967, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, decline rates of these populations have been estimated to be more than 50% over the past 10 years. They are also protected by the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act.

Virginia Big-Eared Bat

The Virginia Big-Eared bat is part of the Animalia kingdom, Chordata phylum, Mammalia class, and Chiroptera order. Their scientific name, Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus, is derived from their genus (Corynorhinus), species (C. townsendii), and subspecies (C. t. virginianus). As evident in their scientific classification, this species is one of two endangered subspecies of the Townsend’s big-eared bat. Read our blog, “Get to Know Our State Bat” to learn details about their range, habitat, diet, and more.

In Virginia, the Rafinesque Big-eared Bat (also known as the Southeastern Big-eared Bat) is state-endangered. We will discuss this more in our next blog, so be sure to check back soon!

Bat Threats

Right now, the biggest threat to these endangered bat populations is a fatal disease known as White Nose Syndrome. Read our blog, “Facts About White-Nose Syndrome and Bats” to learn more. Aside from this disease, additional threats include over-development of land, wildlife habitat destruction, and illegal hunting. There are many reasons to support local bat populations, regardless if they are endangered or not. That is because bats provide us with so many advantages. Read our blog, “How to Safely Support Local Bat Colonies” to learn how you can do your part to encourage bat conservation.

Where to Get Licensed Bat Removal in Virginia

Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for safe and humane bat removal and control at a fair price. Regardless of the size or scope of your bat abatement and cleanup needs, we have the experience and resources necessary to remedy your bat problem in no time at all. Our professionals are focused on safe and effective results, but more importantly, our client’s complete satisfaction. Contact us anytime for free estimates, advice, and assistance.

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

5 Educational Facts About Bats

Bats are mostly known as a scary threat, or a neighborhood nuisance; but bats are much more than that. In fact, they are a greatly misunderstood species that deserve a better reputation. Continue reading to review 5 interesting and educational facts about bats, and better understand their importance in our world.

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

❶ Bats Serve a Vital Ecological and Economical Role

Bats feed heavily on our local insect populations every night, allowing us to have more comfortable backyard living areas, more enjoyable outdoor fun and activity, and less spread of disease and crop mutilation. Bats also support local economies among farmers, vendors, and consumers because the prevent crop mutilation. Farmers have also been known to use bat droppings, or “guano”, to fertilize their land. In fact, guano mining is a significant enterprise in the agricultural industry, worldwide.

Furthermore, Megabats, found in tropical and subtropical regions, primarily feed on pollen and nectar of fruits and flowers. This diet behavior provides a significant benefit ecologically and agriculturally by means of pollination, seed dispersal, which promotes cross-fertilization. We can thank Megabats for crops like bananas, avocados, mangoes, nuts, figs and cacao. Also, vampire bat species are an important focus in the medical research industry because their saliva contains an anticoagulant protein called “Desmoteplase” that researchers speculate can be used as medicine for stroke patients and blood clot prevention in humans.

❷ There are More Than 1,300 Species of Bat Around the World

Bats are a mammal that are native to almost every region of the world. And although there are more than 1,300 known species of bat, it is suspected that thousands more exist. Differences in features, behaviors, diet, size, and more, are what separate the known bat colonies, worldwide. Here in Virginia, the most common bat species found include the Little Brown bat, the Big Brown bat, Eastern Small-footed bat, Northern Long-eared bat, Eastern Pipistrelle bat, Silver-haired Bat, Eastern Red bat, Hoary bat, Seminole bat, American Long-Eared bat, Lump-Nosed bat, Evening bat, Ozark Big-Eared bat, Townsend’s Big-Eared bat, and the Northern Myotis. Endangered species are local to Virginia as well, including the Indiana bat, the Gray bat, and the Southeastern Big-eared Bat (also known as Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat).

❸ Some Species of Bat Do Not Hibernate for the Winter

It is assumed by many that all bats hibernate for the winter. The truth is, some species hibernate and others do not. Some species of bat migrate instead of hibernate, and travel south to warmer areas for the cold season. Such species include the Spotted bat, Mexican free-tailed bat, and the lesser long-nose bat. Other species of bat do hibernate, thus entering into a state of torpor, or low metabolic activity. Bats cycle through periods of torpor and periods of moderate arousal, for the duration of winter. Bats generally prefer to hibernate in hollowed trees, rock crevices, caves, abandoned mines, and even residential and commercial buildings.

❹ Bats Do Not Have Very Many Natural Predators

You would think an animal as tiny as a bat would be at the top of something’s diet sheet, but really, they have very few natural predators. In fact, the biggest threat to bat survival is the threat of disease. For instance, a fungal diseases known as White Nose Syndrome, has killed millions of bat populations throughout the world. Read our blog, “Facts About White-Nose Syndrome and Bats” to learn more about this devastating bat disease. Mostly, predatory wildlife such as owls, hawks, and snakes will eat bats, but rarely go out of their way for them.

❺ Bats are the Only Mammal That Can Truly Fly!

Sure, you’ve heard of Flying Squirrels and other animals that seem to fly; but they are really just soaring, floating, or drifting on air currents. Bats, on the other hand, are capable of true flight, which means they can take off, maintain flight, and land, on demand. They can fly just the same as a bird, but they are a mammal. And they are the ONLY mammal that can do that! Not only can they fly, they are fast, with some species achieving speeds of 100 miles per hour!

Do You Have Nuisance Bats?

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

Call Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for safe and humane bat removal and control assistance in Old Dominion. We serve all of Virginia with 24 hour bat removal, as well as, numerous residential and commercial bat exclusion services, such as bat cleanup and restorations for bat damages. We even provide insurance work! Contact us at 804-729-9097 to request a free estimate, anytime.