Do Bats Use Sounds to See?

There are many species around the world that use sound reverberation to better navigate their surroundings, including toothed and baleen whales like dolphins, porpoises, killer whales, sperm whales, gray whales, and rorquals. Even certain species of bird are hypothesized to use a type of sound navigation system. The ability to both emit ultrasonic sound waves and use the sound reverberations to map the environment is a biological, built-in system known as biosonar, which is also referred to as echolocation. Like the species of echolocating animals, microbats also use sounds to see.

Continue reading to learn more about echolocation in bats, including how bio-sonar works and why bats use it.

Virginia Bat Control Assistance 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Control Assistance 804-729-9097

Microbats Have Echolocation Abilities

As discussed in many blogs prior, there are two primary species of bats: microbats (Megachiroptera) and megabats (Megachiroptera). Megabats are also known as fruit bats or old world fruit bats because they mainly eat the juices and nectar of fruits and flowers. Megabats do not retain echolocating abilities. However, some recent studies show that some might, like the Egyptian fruit bat. Because megabats do not prey on living organisms, they do not need to rely on flying accuracy and agility, so it makes sense that they would not have echolocating abilities.

Microbats, on the other hand, are insectivores and can eat their body weight in flying insects each night. All microbat species use echolocation, such as Big Brown Bats, Little Brown Bats, Lesser Long Nosed bats, and even our beloved state bat, the Virginia Big-Eared bat. But why? Well, it’s not because they are blind or have poor vision.

Bats are Not Blind

Many people correlate bats and blindness, and assume it is the reason they have echolocation capabilities. But the truth is, bats can see very well. They use their echolocation to improve the precision and speed of their hunting abilities. Echolocation allows bats to better dive and dart more accurately for mosquitoes, gnats, flies, moths, and all the other flying insects they consume each night. Microbats are nocturnal, so they are usually out hunting during dawn and dusk when lighting is very low or gone entirely.

How Echolocation Works

Echolocation is the process of emitting ultrasonic sound waves that are discharged into the surrounding area. These sounds reverberate and bounce back toward the bat, which in turn provides a more descriptive mapping of its surroundings. We can measure how bats use their echolocation because they emit a clicking noise when echolocating. Amazingly, bats compare the outbound pulsations with the returning echoes to generate a detailed mental image of their surroundings.

Are experiencing heightened bat activity around your property, thus causing you concern about structural damage and possible infestation? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for comprehensive bat removal and control services in Richmond and all surrounding Virginia counties. We serve commercial and residential clients.

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3 Big-Eared Bat Species Found in Virginia

Although it can be argued that all bats have big ears relative to their body size, there are a few bat species that really set the bar high. Here in Virginia, three big-eared bat species in particular are native to the region, and with great luck, spotted out in nature from time to time. What are these bats? Why are they special? Great questions!

Continue reading to learn some interesting and important facts about the Northern Long-Eared Bat, Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat, and our state bat, the Virginia Big-Eared bat!

Big Ears No Tears

The bigger the ears the better; right? For Microchiroptera bats across the world, it is! Microbat species have an enlarged tragus in their ears that help them focus sound (some bats have this growth on their nose, like the Leaf-Nose bat). They have excellent hearing, as they are able to hear vocalizations of other bats from far away and at extremely high frequencies, between 14,000 and 100,000 hertz. Humans have a general hearing range of 20,000 hertz, just for reference.

So, all in all, bats are not apologetic for their big, old ears! They need them to communicate with other bats, hunt for prey, and much more! The most famous bats with large ears are the Northern Long-Eared Bat, Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat, and Virginia Big-Eared bat. Below you will find the most interesting facts about each species, including their scientific name and classification, diet, habitat, range, and endangerment status.

🦇 Northern Long-Eared Bat

The Northern Long-Eared bat is scientifically called Myotis septentrionalis.

As a microbat species, the Northern Long-Eared bat maintains an insectivorous diet consisting mostly of moths, flies, caddisflies, beetles, and even spiders. Unlike many other microbats, rather than preying on their meals mid-flight, the Northern Long-Eared bat uses a unique hunting method known as gleaning. Basically, they stick close to the tree lines and snatch up their prey directly from twigs, branches, and leaves.

You can usually find colonies of Northern Long-Eared bats in most regions of Virginia. Here in the state, they have taken liking to dams and mines for shelter. They also roost in caves and rocky crevices. They are not solitary, and often roost with other bat species, like Indiana bats and Little Brown bats.

Northern Long-Eared bats look much like Little Brown bats, in fact. But they have long ears that look like a rabbit that measure an average of a half an inch to 0.7 inches in length. They weigh an average of 3 ounces, which is similar to other regional bat species.

Northern Long-Eared bats are not endangered, but they are unfortunately a species that has been affected by White-Nose Syndrome. This fungal disease is one of the biggest and most impactful threats to this species.

🦇 Rafinesque’s Big-Eared Bat

The Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat is scientifically referred to as Corynorhinus rafinesquii.

The Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat is a microbat species found mostly in the bottomland hardwoods and swamps in the Coastal Plain regions of Virginia. They are typically found roosting in hollow trees or in caves but will also take up shelter in rock crevices and old buildings. Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat colonies in the appellation Mountains prefer roosting in caves, but it really just depends on the geographic location of the colony.

When it comes to diet, Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bats our insectivores like most other microbats. Their preferred meal is moths, but they also like to eat beetles and other flying insects.

The Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat has bigger ears than the Northern Long-Eared bat, coming in at 1.25 inches in length. They also have long, soft, bi-colored fur, making them quite the stunning bat. In fact, they look so similar to our state bat, that they are often confused for one another.

Unfortunately, Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bats are a state endangered bat and currently on the conservation list. The loss and degradation of their natural habitats is a top cause of the declining Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat population.

🦇 Virginia Big-Eared Bat

The Virginia Big-Eared bat is scientifically named Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus.

As our beloved state bat, the Virginia Big-Eared bat is an important bat species. They are not native to the entirety of the state, but rather in short ranges within West Virginia. They do not commonly travel outside of 20 mile radius from their roosts, although some have been found to travel 40 miles outside of their primary colony location when traveling between winter and summer roosts.

Virginia Big-Eared bats mostly roost in caves or along bodies of water in large rock crevices. It really just depends on the level of access and the season.

The Virginia Big-Eared bat has a very similar insectivorous diet to their pseudo-twin, the Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat, eating mostly moths. Virginia Big-Eared bats will also eat other insects, like flies, beetles, grasshoppers, and even wasps.

As for their ears, they maintain their status as the pseudo-twin to the Rafinesque’s Big-Eared bat, with their large ears measuring in at 1.25 inches just the same.

Unfortunately, not only is the Virginia Big-Eared bat state-endangered, but they are also federally endangered. One of the top threats to the decline of their populations is

Well, there you have it; the top bat species in Virginia with big, long ears! Do your part to support bat conservation efforts by sealing your home properly against bat intrusions, plus protecting local bat populations by vaccinating your pets and even setting up some bat houses on your property!

Never, under any circumstances, attempt to touch, trap, catch, harm, or kill a bat. If you have a bat in the house, in the yard, or bats in the attic, contact a local and trusted wildlife critter control company for emergency bat removal services. They have the proper licensing, permits, training, and resources to remove bats and control their activity in and around your property.

Looking for a bat removal company in the Virginia areas? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for safe and humane critter control for bats in Richmond and all surrounding counties and locations. We serve both residential and commercial clients.

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Federally Endangered Species of Bat in Virginia
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Educational Facts About the Virginia Bat

The Virginia Big-Eared bat is one of three federally-listed endangered species of bat in Virginia. In fact, it has been categorized as endangered since 1979 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. There are several interesting facts about the Virginia Big-Eared bat species, adding more reason to keep these precious critters protected and preserved.

Continue reading to learn more about the Virginia Big-Eared bat, and what to do if you suspect you are having nuisance bat issues around your property.

Richmond VA Critter Control Bats 804-729-9097
Richmond VA Critter Control Bats 804-729-9097

Scientific Classification for the Virginia Big-Eared Bat

The Virginia Big-Eared bat is indeed our state bat! It is part of the Animalia kingdom, Chordata phylum, Mammalia class, and Chiroptera order. Their scientific name, Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus, is derived from their genus (Corynorhinus), species (C. townsendii), and subspecies (C. t. virginianus).

Physical Appearance

This special species is distinguishable by its large ears, which can reach lengths of 2.5 centimeters or more. When resting, their ears reach back to half the length of their body! In addition to their most distinguishable trait, these mammals have long, soft, brown fur that ranges in shade depending on their age.

Weighing and average of 7 to 12 grams (0.25 to 0.42 ounces), it is one of the largest Microchiroptera species in its range. With rounded muzzle and elongated nostrils, the Virginia Big-Eared bat can grow to 98 millimeters (3.85 inches) long by adult hood.

Behavior

The VBE bat usually mates in the fall and winter. Females actually store the male’s sperm until they begin ovulation, which generally occurs in late winter or early spring. Females have a gestation period of 3 months, and give birth to only one baby, called a “pup.” 

The pup stay with the mother for up to 8 weeks, in which time they are fully-developed and capable of flight. These bats generally roost in caves, where they also hibernate for the winter. Because they prefer it, they are mostly found in mountainous limestone caves surrounded by forest with oak and hickory trees.

Range

Although they are called the Virginia Big-Eared bat, they are not just native to Virginia. They are also found in states like Kentucky and North Carolina. The Virginia Big-Eared bat species is not a migratory one; they stay in their caves all year, whether hibernating or not.

They only leave to hunt for food at night, which they do with the help of their amazing sonar abilities called echolocation. Bats see quite well, opposed to common belief, and only use their echolocation abilities to better dart and dive for insects. They are nocturnal, so it also improves their night-time navigational skills.

Nuisance Bats

If you are experiencing wildlife problems with bats, on or around your property, it is vital to contact a licensed Richmond VA bat control company for safe, humane, and non-lethal critter abatement services. Never attempt to trap, touch, harm, or kill a bat under any circumstances. This is also important since you never know if it is a federally-protected species.

Are you dealing with persistent nuisance bat problems? Do you suspect that you might have a bat infestation in the house? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for prompt and professional bat removal and control you can afford. We serve residential and commercial clients.

Related Blogs:

Which Bats are Native to the State of Virginia?
The Difference Between a Wild Bat and a Nuisance Bat
What You Need to Know About the Department of Health and Bats

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

Top Ingredients to Use for a Nuisance Bat Repellent

We love animals. We just don’t want them taking shelter in or around our homes and businesses. Animals like bats are highly beneficial to our Eco-system and economies, but they are also highly destructive, even known carriers of several infectious diseases. So, although we don’t want bats hanging around, we also don’t want them to be affected by our animal abatement methods in a negative way. Fortunately, for people like you and me, there is a safe and humane way to get rid of bats using a homemade, nontoxic solution.

Continue reading to learn how to make your very own bat repellent using the top 3 most effective and safest ingredients.

Richmond VA Bat Removal Services 804-729-9097
Richmond VA Bat Removal Services 804-729-9097

Animal Repellent Spray Supplies

A spray solution is the easiest way to make an animal repellent for bats, plus the easiest to apply. To make a homemade bat repellent, you will need clean water, a clean plastic spray bottle that is at least 16 ounces, and a few household ingredients. Now, there are several ingredients you can add to your bat repellent solution, but the top ingredients that bats really seem to hate include putrescent egg, capsaicin, and menthol.

It is also suggested that mothballs work well to repel bats, however they may not be safe for homes with children and pets. Likewise, capsaicin may also irritate the eyes, nose, and throat, so aim to apply your repellent far away from children and pet play areas. If that’s not possible, it may be a good idea to leave it out of your solution, altogether.

Why They are Suggested to Work

Putrescent egg is scientifically formulated to mimic the smell of a decaying animals, which bats perceive as a predatory zone. They will steer clear is such danger zones. Capsaicin is the main ingredient in hot peppers. It is responsible for the burning, tingling sensation that you experience when you eat something with hot sauce or hot peppers in it. Bats do not like these smells and sensations, and will stay away from them at all costs. The same applies for menthol. If you cannot access capsaicin, you can substitute it with cayenne pepper or red chili pepper. If you cannot access menthol, mint works well too.

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

▶ Clean Water
▶ Clean Plastic Spray Bottle
▶ Putrescent Egg Solids
▶ Capsaicin Oil
▶ Menthol Oil

Where to Buy Animal Repellent Ingredients

You can purchase putrescent egg at any local home improvement or garden store. You may be able to purchase them at local farmers’ markets and through private sellers, online. Capsaicin oil and menthol oil can be purchased online through any common retailer, or you can purchase them at any local department store. The grocery or drug store might even have them in the pharmacy more wellness section.

How to Make Bat Repellent:

➀ Fill the plastic spray bottle 3/4 of the way with clean water.
➁ Add ¼ cup of putrescent egg solids.
➂ Add 10 drops of capsaicin oil.
➃ Add 10 drops of mental oil.

How to Use Bat Repellent:

➀ Make sure that To the bottle is secured on tightly.
➁ Gently turn upside down and right side up a few times to ensure the solution mixes.
➂ Spray in high traffic areas or around the perimeter of your property to keep bats out.

Does it seem like no matter what you try you continue to have a problem with nuisance bats? Just contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for licensed and insured bat removal and control you can afford. We serve residential and commercial properties.

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The Top Three Signs that You Have Bats in the House
How to Safely Support Local Bat Colonies

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

The True Facts About Bats and Blindness

Have you ever used the adage, “blind as a bat?” If so, you may be disappointed to learn that you were incorrect. That is because bats are not actually blind. But don’t be ashamed if you always thought this; many people share the same misconception. The truth is that there are more than 1,400 bat species in the world, and not one of those species is blind. What’s even more interesting is that they actually have quite good vision, especially Megachiroptera species (fruit and old-world). This makes sense, as they are night-hunters. So, vision is important for darting and dashing for prey.

Continue reading to learn more interesting facts about bat vision, echolocation, and more.

Bats Critter Control Service Virginia 804-729-9097
Bats Critter Control Service Virginia 804-729-9097

Megabats and Microbats

There are two main categories of bat species: Megachiroptera and Microchiroptera, also known as megabats and microbats. Megachiroptera, or megabats, are large bats that live in tropical and subtropical climates. They maintain a diet of fruits and nectar, but some species are also known to consume small amphibians and fish.

As for vision, Megachiroptera have large eyes and a pronounced visual cortex that allow them to see very well. They also have a good sense of smell. Some species, like Flying Foxes, actually see well during the day, and are dependent on their daytime vision to fly around on moonless nights. They can also see in color!

Microchiroptera, or microbats, are different from megabats in many ways, however, their vision is just as good. Despite their poorly developed small eyes, scientists have confirmed that microbats have both rods and cone photo-receptor cells in the retinas, giving them the ability to see in the day, in color, and at night.

Furthermore, Microchiroptera (not all species, but most) have a built-in sonar system called echolocation, which emits high-frequency ultrasonic pulses into the air that bounce back and outline the surrounding environment.

Bat echolocation is why many people believe these mammals are blind. But echolocation is simply a bonus attribute that allows microbats to hunt faster and with more precision.

How to Manage Nuisance Bat Problems in Virginia

You will know you have a bat problem when you begin to identify the signs. Common indications include strange noises coming from walls and ceilings, yellow or brown stains on walls or ceilings, foul odors in concentrated areas of the home, bat guano or bird-like droppings, and seeing bats fly around your home at night.

If you are concerned about bats in the attic or around your property in Virginia, there are many safe and affordable options for animal proofing, inspection, and extraction. If you find a bat in the house, never attempt to catch, trap, touch, harm, or kill a wild bat. Instead, contact a 24 hour Virginia wildlife removal company for licensed bat removal and control you can trust.

Are you having problems with nuisance bats around your house? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for comprehensive bat removal and control services in Richmond and all surrounding Virginia areas, including Fairfax County, Norfolk, and Manassas. We serve residential and commercial clients.

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Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

Do Bats Go into Hibernation Soon?

Here in Virginia, we are home to several species of Microchiroptera bats. Also known as microbats, Microchiroptera are insectivores, eating nothing but mosquitoes, gnats, moths, flies, and several other types of flying insects. So, it makes sense that microbats might not want to stick around here for the winter season when the quantity of flying insects are much lower than they are compared to spring and summer.

Now that fall is here, are bats preparing for hibernation? Do bats in Virginia hibernate at all? If they do hibernate, where they go? You may be asking all of these questions and more. If you are, you are in the right place.

Continue reading to learn more about Virginia bats, including their hibernation practices, where they go for winter, and what you can expect this fall from the local bat populations in your Old Dominion communities.

Richmond Bat Removal Services 804-729-9097
Richmond Bat Removal Services 804-729-9097

Bats and Hibernation

So, do bats hibernate? Yes! Beginning in October or November, microbats will begin their hibernation schedule, which typically ends in March. Also known as torpor, bat hibernation serves the purpose of reducing the rate at which the body burns fat reserves. Torpor is a state of decreased metabolic activity in which the heart rate and body temperature drop significantly. During this time, bats might only take one breath per hour. It is also recorded that a bat’s heartbeat can drop to as low as 10 beats per minute (BPM) during torpor.

Since the number of flying insects substantially drops beginning in the fall and through the winter, hibernating during this time of year is a means of survival for bats in Virginia. It is suggested that 97% of the world’s microbat species hibernate.

Common Hibernation Locations for Microbats

Microbats, especially the ones here in Virginia, prefer to hibernate in areas that are safely distant from predators. Hollowed trees, caves, mines, large rock crevices, tunnels, cellars, crypts, church bell towers, and similar locations are prime target areas for bats.

In more suburban and Metropolitan areas, bats can be a nuisance to home and business owners. Oftentimes, bats choose to hibernate within residential and commercial settings. In fact, it is common for bat roosts and infestations to be found after the winter season in areas like attics, roofing systems, chimneys, vaults, wine cellars, basements, crawlspaces, and even in wall voids.

How to Get Rid of Bats in the Attic

if you suspect or have already discovered about infestation in your house or building, it is important to act fast. Bats are highly destructive, and they can also be known carriers of several infectious diseases. Contact a local and trusted Virginia bat removal and control company for emergency bat extraction services and cleanup solutions.

Licensed and experienced critter control professionals will have the proper resources and technologies to safely remove bats and sanitize/restore any area that bats have infested. The sooner you resolve a nuisance that problem, the more time and money you save in the long run.

Are you concerned that nuisance bats are to be a problem to your home or building? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for prompt and professional bat removal and control you can afford. We serve residential and commercial clients.

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Virginia Bat Removal and Control
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

The Two Most Common Species of Bats in the Attic

If you discover bats in the attic in Virginia, it is very likely that the roost is one of two common species known to intrude residential properties around this region. Continue reading to learn the top two most common species of bats in the attic, and what to do to get rid of them for good!

Bats in the Attic Removal and Clean Up 804-729-9097
Bats in the Attic Removal and Clean Up 804-729-9097

 The Big Brown Bat

The Big Brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) is one of the most common Microchiroptera bat species on this side of the globe, from Canada to Mexico and everywhere in between. Here in Virginia, the Big Brown bat is a promising suspect if you have bats in the attic. When the Big Brown bat is not roosting in residential spaces like attics and barns, they are often taking up space in tree cavities, buildings, riverbank caverns, and under bridges.

Not a solitary species, Big Brown bats generally roost in colonies that can skyrocket to hundreds of bats in as little as a few years. In nature, you can expect a Big Brown bat colony to average around 200 or 300 bats at one time. Mating season is in fall and winter, but female bats become pregnant in Spring and move to a separate colony to rear their pups.

Big Brown bats are insectivores, mainly dining on small insects like mosquitos, wasps, crickets, moths, grasshoppers, beetles, and gnats. They can consume their body weight in insects each night, using their echolocation skills to better dart and dive for prey.

The Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus)
The Big Brown Bat (Eptesicus fuscus)

The Little Brown Bat

Another Microchiroptera bat species common to this region of the country is the Little Brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). Very similar to Big Brown bats, Little Brown bats are insectivorous, roost in large numbers, and prefer to take shelter in hollowed trees, caves, buildings, bridges, and of course, attics.

On the other hand, they are much smaller in in size compared to Big Brown bats and can often squeeze through an opening as little as 3/8ths an inch! For this reason, they are a common species of bats that roost in residential attics and spaces.

When homeowners have bats in the attic in Richmond VA, it is usually a colony of Little Brown bats. Because they hibernate half of the year, their roosts often go unnoticed until Spring, when bats come out of hibernacula to birth their young.

Virginia Bat Removal 804-729-9097
Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus)

Emergency Bat Removal for Bats in the Attic

Regardless of species, you do not want a bat infestation to go on unresolved. Bats cause a massive amount of destruction to attics, from soiled floorboards and ceilings to attic insulation damage, parasite outbreaks, guano piles, and more. Additionally, bats carry transmissible diseases that are unsafe for your family and pets. Overall, having bats in the attic is unhygienic, destructive, and messy to clean up, so you do not want them in there in the first place.

As soon as you suspect that you have bats in the house or attic, contact a reputable Richmond VA bat control company for emergency bat removal services. A well-established and professional company will provide expert bat clean up and minor attic repairs for damages caused by bats.

Would you like to learn how to protect your home from bat intrusions and damages? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for bat removal and control in Richmond, Virginia. We serve both residential and commercial clients in all surrounding counties and locations.

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Virginia Bat Removal and Control
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

Comparing Little Brown Bats With Big Brown Bats

Two of the most prevalent microbats found in the surrounding Virginia regions are the Little Brown bat and the Big Brown bat. Although they share sister names, they are quite different from one another in terms of biology. Continue reading to learn some fun and informative facts about both species of microbat, as well as what you should do if you ever find a bat in the house or other area of your property.

Virginia Bat Control Services 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Control Services 804-729-9097

The Microbats of Virginia

Little Brown Bats

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
The Little Brown Bat

Adult bats have an average wingspan of 9 to 11 inches, and a body length of 2 1/2 to 4 inches. They are small! Their fur ranges in colors of dark browns to reddish browns, with lighter-colored, pale tan bellies. Females carry their young for 60 days, before giving birth to a single bat pup each year. Mating season usually begins in early fall, while birthing season starts in May and continues through July.

After 14 days in their mother’s care, bat pups are weaned from milk and taught to fly and hunt for insects. Little Brown bats, like all bats, are nocturnal, which means they are active from dusk until dawn. Generally, this bat species remains in large numbers, with colonies reaching hundreds or even thousands of bats in some regions.

Typically, Little Brown bats roost in hollowed tree cavities, abandoned mines, caves, log piles, and similar private areas. They are a hibernating species, so in winter, they either migrate to winter roosts, or hibernate in caves, rock crevices, storm sewers, and if they can access them, our attics!

As insectivores, Little Brown bats hunt for mosquitos, gnats, moths, crane flies, beetles, mayflies, and other small flying insects. A single bat can consume more than 1,000 flying bugs in just one night! That is excellent pest control, and it’s free!

Big Brown Bats

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
The Big Brown Bat

The Big Brown bat may look like the Little Brown bat, but they are a different species, and just a tad larger, as the names implies. Adult bats have an average wingspan of 13 to 16 inches, and a body length of 3 1/2 to 5 1/2 inches. They are a little bigger as you can see! The rest of their biology and behaviors are the same, with just slight differences.

Their fur is the same as Little Brown bats, ranging in colors from dark browns to reddish hues and lighter-colored bellies. Gestation periods and breeding are the same for both species, as well. Females carry their young for 60 days, before giving birth to a single bat pup each year.

Mating season usually begins in early fall, while birthing season starts in May and continues through June. After 14 days in their mother’s care, bat pups are weaned from milk and taught to fly and hunt for insects. In contrast to Little Brown bats, Big Brown bats tend to roost in smaller colonies, ranging from as little as 20 bats, up to 500 or more.

Do you think you might require bat removal or control assistance for your home or commercial property? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for professional bat removal services in Virginia, including Richmond and surrounding counties.

You Should Also Read:

Which Bats are Native to the State of Virginia?
Facts About Megabats and Microbats
4 Areas of a Home You Might Find a Bat

Virginia Bat Removal and Control
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

Why Bats are Actually Important to Us

Bats have to be one of the most misunderstood wild animal species around the world. They are perceived to be scary, flying rodents, when in fact, they are one of the most interesting mammals on earth. That’s right; bats are mammals, not rodents, and they are the only mammal on the planet capable of true flight! Although some animals might float, drift, glide, or hover, bats can actually fly just like a bird. Their ability to fly is a major factor in why bats are so important.

Continue reading to learn how bats play a vital role in our surrounding ecosystems, and what you can do to continue the national initiative to conserve and protect these valuable mammals.

Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097
Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

The Role Bats Play in the Supporting Our Local Ecosystems

Bats are nocturnal mammals that come out at night to hunt for their prey. They use their bio-sonar abilities, called echolocation, to better dive and dart for their meals. As insectivores, microbats commonly dine on all sorts of bugs, including gnats, flies, moths, beetles, and their favorite, mosquitoes. This is one of the main reasons why they are so ecologically important. Bats play an integral role in pest management.

You see, just one bat can consume more than 1,000 insects in a single night. And since bats are not solitary mammals, there is always dozens, sometimes hundreds, of bats hunting for insects in a particular area.  With so much insect control, people are safer from transmissible diseases that can be spread by biting insects, as well as potential anaphylactic reactions from stings. Furthermore, our backyards and outdoor areas are more comfortable since there are not as many bugs bothering us.

Bats and the Economy

Bats also play an integral role in the local economies as a result of their insect control skills. Farmers and gardeners see better value in their crops and yields because there are less pests eating away at their produce. Farmed lands are better protected against pest destruction and tampering when bats are around. Better crops mean better business for everyone; it also means healthier, tastier food for consumers.

Managing Nuisance Bats

If you have a bat problem in your vicinity, do not take it out on the bats. They are innocent creatures just doing what they can to survive in nature. Land over-development, pollution, and more, sometimes drives bats out of their natural habitat and into ours. When bats are a bother on your property, call in licensed professionals for safe and humane abatement service.

Do you need to get rid of bats in or around your house? Contact Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for licensed bat removal and control services you can trust. We serve residential and commercial clients all of Virginia, including Richmond, Virginia Beach, Midlothian, Roanoke, and more.

You Should Also Read:

Fantastic Bat Facts for Kids
Get to Know Our State Bat!
How to Properly Maintain Bat Houses

Midlothian, Virginia Bat Removal and Control
Midlothian, Virginia Bat Removal and Control 804-729-9097

The Truth About Bats and Blindness

Have you heard that old adage, “blind as a bat?” Well, if you were a bat, you would be quite offended by this saying. That is because bats are not blind! They don’t even have poor eyesight really. It’s just another classic misconception and misunderstanding about this amazing and highly-beneficial mammalian species we call bats.

Continue reading to learn the real truth about bats and blindness, as well as, how to protect your property from any nuisance bat interference.

Virginia Bat Control Company
Virginia Bat Control Company 804-729-9097

Bats are NOT Blind After All

Many people are aware that bats, Microbats specifically, use echolocation. For this reason, they wrongly assume that bats cannot see well. Yes, it is true that microbats (Microchiroptera) use echolocation to navigate around in the dark, but this is solely to help hunt prey more accurately. In fact, microbats can see quite well (and even hear quite well by the way), but they use their Echolocating abilities to navigate their course, as well as, dart and dash for prey at a more precise rate.

Bats Use Echolocation But Do Not Rely on it for Sight

Echolocation is also referred to as “biosonar”, which is a built-in biological system that works by measuring the returning echoes of emitted signals that bounce off surrounding objects. Many animals aside from bats use this type of built-in sonar system, including species of dolphins, porpoises, toothed whales, Killer whales, dwarf sperm whales, shrews, and some species of bird.

Megabats, also called Fruit bats, do not have echolocating abilities. They have big eyes and great vision, so they have no need for echolocation.

Echolocation is made possible through vocalizations that are produced by the larynx of microbats, but released through mouth and nostrils. There are a few species of Rousettus in the Megabat suborder that use a similar sonar system to Microbats, but in contrast to producing sounds in the larynx, they produce sounds by clicking their tongues.

When bats use echolocation, they emit signals in ultrasonic pulses over 15 kilohertz which then travel through the air and bounce off of surrounding objects. Bats analyze the returning sounds to identify the objects and assess the distance between them. The type of signals and sounds emitted by echolocating bats differ among species in many aspects, including frequency, length of call, intensity, and degree of modulations.

Do You See Bats Around Your House at Dusk?

Get Trusted Virginia Bat Removal and Control ASAP!

Call Virginia Bat Pros at 804-729-9097 for non-lethal bat removal and control assistance in Virginia. We serve all of Old Dominion, including Richmond, Petersburg, Short Pump, Lynchburg, Charlottesville, Norfolk, Chesapeake, Newport News, Virginia Beach, and more. We offer 24 hour bat removal, as well as, numerous residential and commercial bat exclusion services, such as bat cleanup and restorations for bat damages. We even provide insurance work! Contact us today for a free estimate.